Labels

Portrait (310) Travel (205) Food or Coffee (115) Trip (93) Landscape (92) Thailand (56) Selangor (51) Kuala Lumpur (44) Vietnam (42) Wedding (41) Japan (38) Video (37) Pulau Pinang (32) Gone Big (29) Over Night (29) Event (26) Hong Kong (24) Pahang (24) Korea (23) Perak (13) Dairy (11) Melaka (11) Cambodia (10) China (6) Flora (5) Macau (5) Negeri Sembilan (4) Fauna (3) For Sale (2) Kedah (2) Kuantan (2) Indonesia (1) Johor (1) Pulau Langkawi (1) Taiwan (1)

Thursday, July 23, 2015

Vietnam . Mũi Né . Their Life . Their Work


Vietnam . Mũi Né . Their Life . Their Work



Understand about it
Northeast of Phan Thiet the coastal road climbs over the slope of a Cham-Tower-topped hill and descends onto the long, sandy crescent of Mui Ne Bay. The formerly little-inhabited beach south of the fishing village of Mui Ne proper has seen some serious development in the last 15 years. Now it is a 15 km long strip of resorts that line up like pearls on Nguyen Dinh Chieu street, shaded by coconut palms. The main resort strip lies between the addresses of 2 and 98 Nguyen Dinh Chieu and is actually named Ham Tien.
Given the choice, nature would move the sand around, much to the dismay of some developers. Beach sand tends to migrate up and down the coast seasonally, leaving some (but not all) spots with just a concrete breakwater rather than sandy beach. There is always a good sandy beach somewhere along this 10 km beach. Accommodations at higher addresses tend to be smaller and less expensive, somewhat removed from the main tourist section and more mixed in with local life. If a sandy beach is important to you, some research is called for before booking in that area.
A few bargain hotels have popped up on the inland side of the road, across from the beach-side resorts. If you stay on the inland side, you will need to pass though one of the resorts to reach the beach, which might or might not result in some hassle from the guards. The resorts jealously guard their lounge chairs and palapas, though the beach itself is open to everyone. If all else fails, you can always access a nice sandy stretch of beach via the Joe's Cafe with a drink purchase at 86 Nguyen Dinh Chieu.
The town is very popular with Russian package tour tourists which means most of the restaurants have signs, names, menus in Russian.
After the eclipse event October 25, 1995, Mui Ne seems to be shined by scientists and astronomy enthusiasts around the world who flocked to here to admire the eclipse. From that romantic landmarks of Mui Ne are explored, including Mui Ne Fairy Stream. Mui Ne Fairy Stream is a favorite destination of both domestic and foreign tourists. With three main colors: white, red and orange, Mui Ne Fairy Stream becomes unique and mysterious. The water flow of Mui Ne Fairy Stream is not pure as other stream; it is described with orange red color.








What you can see when you visiting here
Po Sha Inu tower is a derelict remainder of the ancient Cham culture that was built in the 8th century.
Fish Sauce Plants, where the famous nuoc mam (fish sauce) is produced. Big jars harbour the concoction that, after months in the blazing sun, is sold all over Vietnam to add some spice to the food.
The famous Sand Dunes (Doi Cat), on the main coastal road a short distance north of the fishing town at the north end of Mui Ne bay, about 10 km from the main resort strip. The whole region is fairly sandy, with orange sand threatening to blow onto the coastal road in some spots. The dunes that visitors visit are about 50ha (1/2km²) of open sand on a hillside with ten-meter undulations, staffed by dusty children with plastic slides, who will offer instruction and assistance if you want to slide on the sand. Avoid these children at all costs. The plastic slides that they offer are simply an excuse to to steal your belongings when you are not looking. They will offer to carry your bag for you as you go sliding, then steal your phone of wallet, and there are so many boys that you wont be able to tell who did it. The dunes also offer nice views of the sea coast to the north. In all, it's worth a half-hour visit, especially if you have rented your own motorbike for the day. On the opposite side of the road are a series of small cafes, where you can park your motorbike for a small fee if you ride there on your own. Most day tours sold by local tour operators include a stop at the dunes. The trip by taxi from the main resort strip would be about 150,000VND each way, and less by xe om. It is reachable by bicycle in 30-45 minutes, passing the Fairy Stream on the way.
Mui Ne market and fishing harbour (Lang chai Mui Ne). Don't miss out on an excursion to this quiet little village, at the north end of Mui Ne bay. The coastal road leads straight into the town (with a left turn required to continue up the coast). At the entrance to town is an overlook with a splendid view of hundreds of colorful fishing boats moored in the bay. Further along into town, just off the main road, there is a small but colorful market. If you take your transport just down to the water, you will reach the fishing harbour, where you can purchase fresh seafood (if you have any means to cook it) or purchase steamed crabs, shellfish, etc. to eat on the spot from local vendors. Walking along the beach, you'll pass by fishermen sorting out their catch, ship-wharfs and, at the southern end of town, a section where clams have been ridded of their shells for many years, so the sand on the beach is by now substituted with littered shells.
The Fairy Stream (Suoi Tien) is a little river that winds its way through bamboo forests, boulders and the dunes behind the village, in parts resembling a miniature version of the Grand Canyon. Local kids will want to accompany you to show you the way (and of course earn a dollar or so), but since you're just following the stream, there's little need. For the most part, the stream is about ankle-deep and no more than knee-deep even at its deepest. It is sandy with few stones and can be walked comfortably barefooted. You can climb up the red sand hills overlooking the river valley and even walk there parallel to the river, however, the sand may be hot on a sunny day, so bring some footwear. Walking upstream for about 20 minutes, you will reach a small waterfall into at most waist-deep water, great to take a refreshing bath before heading back! To reach the stream, head along the main road towards the east until you cross a small bridge. The stream is underneath, you will see a sign pointing towards a path to the left, go that way to reach an easy place to enter the stream. By bicycle it's about 15min from the main resort strip and shouldn't be more than 20,000 by xe om. As of October 2014, there are signs that demand payment to enter the stream. These are accompanied by Vietnamese boys who will ask you to pay. Do not pay; all beaches and rivers are free to access in Vietnam.









How to reach here
Many overseas visitors reach Mui Ne via "Open Tour" buses that run between Ho Chi Minh City and Nha Trang. Most depart from HCMC between 7:30 and 9:00AM or PM (7:30AM for Sinh cafein air-conditioned bus and arrive at Mui Ne at about 1:00 PM, same for night schedule). In the opposite direction, buses typically depart from Mui Ne around 2:00PM or AM and arrive in HCMC at 7:00PM or AM~ five hours at night or in the morning. Joe's Cafe is a good place to catch an outgoing night bus as it offers full service all night and you never know how late the bus will be. Outside HCMC, the coach will stop at a petrol station with a pretty large shop and stalls selling snacks, drinks and fruit.
The buses stop in the heart of the tourist strip in Mui Ne, so there is no need to take a taxi. The cost is about US$6 (105,000VND - Vietnamese dong) each way, and tickets are sold all over the tourist districts of both HCMC and Nha Trang. If you are traveling to HCMC from Mui Ne, you will most likely be put on an already full bus traveling from Nha Trang. Since you are not assigned a seat you may not be able to sit with any traveling companions, and at some of the less scrupulous travel agents you may not even get a real seat (we were put on a mat at the back of the bus with four other people).
Several companies run buses directly to Mui Ne, popular with both locals and travellers alike. In HCMC they depart from the Pham Ngu Lao area (where you can also find their ticket office) and in Mui Ne they'll drop you off and pick you up from your hotel. Prices around 120,000 - 140,000 VND (March 2013), buses depart several times a day and the journey takes 6-7 hours. Both seats and sleeper buses are available, depending on the company.
Public buses from both destinations also travel to Mui Ne, though finding the departure stations and figuring out the schedule might be difficult for visitors. It's not worth the trouble unless you have a strong need to depart at a different time of day than when the Open Tour bus leaves. Travel agencies play dumb because they don't earn anything from helping you find a public bus.

















click here for more Vietnam